Select Page

THE BLOG

Browse by Category

Food  |  Drinks  | Culture & History  | Travel

A Summery Lemon-Vanilla Cake with Strawberries

A Summery Lemon-Vanilla Cake with Strawberries

I don’t think I’m exaggerating when I say that Norwegians hold a record as one of the most enthusiastic cake bakers in the world. We also love to eat cake more often than not. I find our cake culture very special, particularly in Sunnmøre, where I’m from. This is where the tradition is particularly strong. It’s not uncommon to see 20 different cakes being brought out to the table at any one festivity such as baptisms, confirmations, weddings or holiday celebrations.

read more
Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Who has heard of kringle? The kringle is a popular Scandinavian pastry here in the U.S. among those familiar with Nordic cuisine. Often times referred to as the Nordic pretzel because of its similarity in shape, it is said to have arrived in Scandinavian in the 13th century with the Roman Catholic monks. Denmark might be better known for its kringler, and although I’m Norwegian must admit the Danes perhaps have a slight upper hand on coming up with creative varieties of this delicious knot-shaped pastry. The Danish are thought to be the ones who brought kringle to the United States too, so kudos to them for that!

read more

Sjakkruter to complete your Christmas cookie platter

Sjakkruter, translated loosely to 'checkers' or 'chessboard squares', are fun looking butter cookies that many Norwegian homes count as one of their obligatory 7 types of Christmas cookies every year.   I like to call them Norway's version of the American black and...

read more

Norwegian Kransekakestenger

Many Norwegian food fans are very familiar with kransekake, the show- stopping cornucopia-shaped marzipan-like almond cake made for special occasions such as weddings, confirmations, baptisms and Christmas.  Kransekakestenger however, are less known.  If you don't...

read more

Vegan Swedish Meatballs

Before I went vegan, I worked at Swedish restaurant Aquavit, located in midtown New York for a while.  This also happens to be where I met my American husband, who worked as a chef there at the time.  I fell in love with both the food and the chef, and...

read more

Lussekatter to celebrate St. Lucia Day

On December 13th you will smell the sweet scent of lussekatter, otherwise known as saffron buns, around the thousands of homes in Norway and Sweden, to signify the day of Saint Lucia, the protector of the blind. Lussekatter signify that Christmas is just around the...

read more
Krumkaker with trollkrem

Krumkaker with trollkrem

Krumkaker are cone shaped, waffle-like cookies with a pretty pattern, and a very classic and popular in Norwegian cuisine, particularly around Christmas time. I would venture to say it's probably the most well known and made pastry besides lefse, and a true symbol of...

read more

Norwegian julebrød part 2

Julebrød is Norwegian for "Christmas bread", although in some parts of the country this same bread is called "julekake", or Christmas cake.  Not sure why, because although this bread is slightly sweet because of added sugar and dried fruits (raisins, and sometimes...

read more
A Norwegian Christmas Cookie Everyone Will Love

A Norwegian Christmas Cookie Everyone Will Love

Brune pinner literally translates to ‘brown sticks’. Doesn’t sound very romantic or catchy now, does it? But I promise you, even though they sound a tad boring, once you taste these cookies, you’ll fall in love. They are some of the most popular modern Norwegian Christmas cookies today, and for many families, it’s considered one of the obligatory seven types of cookies to make every year during the holidays.  Why seven? This number is associated with good luck in most countries. Seven is also a religious number, but it’s not necessarily a Norwegian tradition. Regardless, I doubt you’ll find seven types of Christmas cookies in any other household outside of Norway (and people of Norwegian descent)!

read more
Gløgg: Scandinavia’s Mulled Red Wine

Gløgg: Scandinavia’s Mulled Red Wine

No Christmas is complete without a hot, spicy cup of gløgg (mulled wine) which warms up your body all the way through to the root of your hair! Sitting down with a glass of gløgg is wonderfully relaxing and tasty in between the stressful pre-holiday chores like cleaning, shopping, and cooking.

read more
Norwegian Fastelavnsboller with a Swedish Twist

Norwegian Fastelavnsboller with a Swedish Twist

Fastelavn is celebrated the Sunday before Ash Wednesday and evolved from the Roman Catholic tradition of celebrating the days before Lent. Often referred to as the Nordic Halloween, children will dress up in costumes and gather treats for the fastelavnfeast. Although we don’t see as much of this tradition in Norway, it’s still practiced in Denmark, who I think are the masters of fastelavn and are known for parades and festivities across the country.

read more
Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Who has heard of kringle? The kringle is a popular Scandinavian pastry here in the U.S. among those familiar with Nordic cuisine. Often times referred to as the Nordic pretzel because of its similarity in shape, it is said to have arrived in Scandinavian in the 13th century with the Roman Catholic monks. Denmark might be better known for its kringler, and although I’m Norwegian must admit the Danes perhaps have a slight upper hand on coming up with creative varieties of this delicious knot-shaped pastry. The Danish are thought to be the ones who brought kringle to the United States too, so kudos to them for that!

read more

Sjakkruter to complete your Christmas cookie platter

Sjakkruter, translated loosely to 'checkers' or 'chessboard squares', are fun looking butter cookies that many Norwegian homes count as one of their obligatory 7 types of Christmas cookies every year.   I like to call them Norway's version of the American black and...

read more

Norwegian Kransekakestenger

Many Norwegian food fans are very familiar with kransekake, the show- stopping cornucopia-shaped marzipan-like almond cake made for special occasions such as weddings, confirmations, baptisms and Christmas.  Kransekakestenger however, are less known.  If you don't...

read more

Vegan Swedish Meatballs

Before I went vegan, I worked at Swedish restaurant Aquavit, located in midtown New York for a while.  This also happens to be where I met my American husband, who worked as a chef there at the time.  I fell in love with both the food and the chef, and...

read more

Lussekatter to celebrate St. Lucia Day

On December 13th you will smell the sweet scent of lussekatter, otherwise known as saffron buns, around the thousands of homes in Norway and Sweden, to signify the day of Saint Lucia, the protector of the blind. Lussekatter signify that Christmas is just around the...

read more
Krumkaker with trollkrem

Krumkaker with trollkrem

Krumkaker are cone shaped, waffle-like cookies with a pretty pattern, and a very classic and popular in Norwegian cuisine, particularly around Christmas time. I would venture to say it's probably the most well known and made pastry besides lefse, and a true symbol of...

read more

Norwegian julebrød part 2

Julebrød is Norwegian for "Christmas bread", although in some parts of the country this same bread is called "julekake", or Christmas cake.  Not sure why, because although this bread is slightly sweet because of added sugar and dried fruits (raisins, and sometimes...

read more
A Norwegian Christmas Cookie Everyone Will Love

A Norwegian Christmas Cookie Everyone Will Love

Brune pinner literally translates to ‘brown sticks’. Doesn’t sound very romantic or catchy now, does it? But I promise you, even though they sound a tad boring, once you taste these cookies, you’ll fall in love. They are some of the most popular modern Norwegian Christmas cookies today, and for many families, it’s considered one of the obligatory seven types of cookies to make every year during the holidays.  Why seven? This number is associated with good luck in most countries. Seven is also a religious number, but it’s not necessarily a Norwegian tradition. Regardless, I doubt you’ll find seven types of Christmas cookies in any other household outside of Norway (and people of Norwegian descent)!

read more