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Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Nothing makes me happier than a traditional, Norwegian dinner. That usually involved boiled potatoes and gravy, with some type of vegetables. There is something so comforting, simplistic, and hearty about it that truly evokes the flavor of ‘home’ for me. I realized I have posted recipes for meatballs on my blog before, or as we call them in Norway, kjøttkaker, but I’ve never shared a recipe for karbonader, which is slightly different.

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Pytt i Panne—A Nearly Forgotten Norwegian Classic

Pytt i Panne—A Nearly Forgotten Norwegian Classic

Pytt i panne is a Norwegian everyday classic dish I probably would most closely compare to Asian stir fry, or a British bubble and squeak or even a good old American hash. Made up of leftovers, it typically consists of fried potatoes, onions, and meat.
Pytt i panne loosely translates to ‘small pieces in a pan’, and that’s exactly what it is. Pytt also indirectly means “everything is going to be ok”, and perhaps that is what they refer to with this dish, as not much can go wrong when you throw in a little bit of this and that.

read more
Fletteloff: A braided loaf to bring you happiness

Fletteloff: A braided loaf to bring you happiness

In my household growing up, all we ate on a daily basis were whole wheat or seeded, whole grain loaves my mom made from scratch. They were healthy and quite heavy but I loved them. I think this is why I often thought of white bread as quite naughty, something reserved only for a special occasion. On the occasional weekend, my mom would splurge and make fletteloff, a braided, light, and fluffy loaf made from white flour that had a slight sweetness to it.

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Best Ever Vegan Vanilla Custard

Best Ever Vegan Vanilla Custard

There have been a few recipes I’ve struggled with as a vegan chef, and vanilla custard has definitely been one of them. Either the texture came out too gelatinous (it’s supposed to be thick and creamy, not jiggly!) or too runny, or the color was off. I see no point in making something if it doesn’t both taste and look good, so the experimentation continued.

read more
The Best Ever Pickling Liquid

The Best Ever Pickling Liquid

Pickling is a huge tradition and has a rich and long history in Norwegian and Scandinavian cuisine. I grew up with a mother who pickled everything from cucumbers, beets, cabbage, pumpkins, all kinds of fruit, and yes…herring too!

read more
Norwegian Flag Cake for May 17th

Norwegian Flag Cake for May 17th

I will admit I’m not a huge cake eater, which is why I don’t have loads of cake recipes on my blog, and if I do, they are super simple and in a more simple and ‘rustic’ style. The exception is the 17th of May of course when no koldtbord (or as the Swedes say, ‘smorgasbord) is complete without at least one decadent cake.

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Riskrem: A simple, yet decadent dessert

Riskrem: A simple, yet decadent dessert

I’m a big fan of the “cook once, eat twice” concept, or in other words—repurposing a dish into a second meal to both save time and money. This is why I love the classic Norwegian dessert riskrem…Riskrem literally translates to ‘rice cream’, and is a great way to make dessert from leftover risgrøt, a traditional dish in Norwegian homes.

read more
A Soup for Potato Lovers

A Soup for Potato Lovers

I love making creamy soups from butternut, potatoes, broccoli, and cauliflower, particularly during colder winter months. It’s simple, quick, nourishing and filling. In this recipe, I cooked potatoes in vegetable broth with a little sautéed onion and garlic and puréed them into a beautifully rich and silky soup. My secret trick is to add in some pre-baked potatoes, which I find adds an extra depth of flavor.

read more
Sweet Orange and Vanilla Custard Buns for Easter

Sweet Orange and Vanilla Custard Buns for Easter

In recreating the wonderful memories of Easter, I couldn’t think of anything more festive and delicious than these sweet, fluffy buns filled with decadent vanilla custard and a glaze made with fresh orange juice. The key to the deliciousness of these buns is to press your own orange juice for both the dough and the glaze from fresh oranges. The flavor is just so much better (and sweeter!), plus you can also save the orange zest and add into your tea or even add some into the dough of the buns.

read more
VILTGRYTE — A Vegan Hunter’s Stew

VILTGRYTE — A Vegan Hunter’s Stew

One of the most popular stews in the fall and winter months in Norway is jegergryte, which can also go by the name of viltgryte or hjortegryte. Respectively, they translate to ‘hunter’s stew’, ‘venison stew’ or ‘deer stew’. Not particularly vegan…but I veganized it!

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Brennsnut

Brennsnut

A recipe for a popular Norwegian soup called brennsnut, which translates into “burnt snout,” because the soup is to be served piping hot. This is a specialty from my region of Sunnmøre, and every household has at one time or another incorporated this dish into their weekly dinner menu.

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Food  |  Drinks  | Culture & History  | Travel

Havrebrød – Norwegian Oat Bread

Havrebrød – Norwegian Oat Bread

It’s no secret that Norwegians love bread. Not only do we love and eat a lot of it in general, but many are also fantastic bakers. I think it’s generally more common for people in Scandinavia to make their own loaves at home than in any other region of the world. We eat bread for breakfast, lunch, and even as a late evening snack before bed. Whether it’s for our lunch box or the more fancy open-faced sandwiches, bread has always played a huge part in our diet.

read more
Pytt i Panne—A Nearly Forgotten Norwegian Classic

Pytt i Panne—A Nearly Forgotten Norwegian Classic

Pytt i panne is a Norwegian everyday classic dish I probably would most closely compare to Asian stir fry, or a British bubble and squeak or even a good old American hash. Made up of leftovers, it typically consists of fried potatoes, onions, and meat.
Pytt i panne loosely translates to ‘small pieces in a pan’, and that’s exactly what it is. Pytt also indirectly means “everything is going to be ok”, and perhaps that is what they refer to with this dish, as not much can go wrong when you throw in a little bit of this and that.

read more
Fletteloff: A braided loaf to bring you happiness

Fletteloff: A braided loaf to bring you happiness

In my household growing up, all we ate on a daily basis were whole wheat or seeded, whole grain loaves my mom made from scratch. They were healthy and quite heavy but I loved them. I think this is why I often thought of white bread as quite naughty, something reserved only for a special occasion. On the occasional weekend, my mom would splurge and make fletteloff, a braided, light, and fluffy loaf made from white flour that had a slight sweetness to it.

read more
Best Ever Vegan Vanilla Custard

Best Ever Vegan Vanilla Custard

There have been a few recipes I’ve struggled with as a vegan chef, and vanilla custard has definitely been one of them. Either the texture came out too gelatinous (it’s supposed to be thick and creamy, not jiggly!) or too runny, or the color was off. I see no point in making something if it doesn’t both taste and look good, so the experimentation continued.

read more
The Best Ever Pickling Liquid

The Best Ever Pickling Liquid

Pickling is a huge tradition and has a rich and long history in Norwegian and Scandinavian cuisine. I grew up with a mother who pickled everything from cucumbers, beets, cabbage, pumpkins, all kinds of fruit, and yes…herring too!

read more
Norwegian Flag Cake for May 17th

Norwegian Flag Cake for May 17th

I will admit I’m not a huge cake eater, which is why I don’t have loads of cake recipes on my blog, and if I do, they are super simple and in a more simple and ‘rustic’ style. The exception is the 17th of May of course when no koldtbord (or as the Swedes say, ‘smorgasbord) is complete without at least one decadent cake.

read more
Riskrem: A simple, yet decadent dessert

Riskrem: A simple, yet decadent dessert

I’m a big fan of the “cook once, eat twice” concept, or in other words—repurposing a dish into a second meal to both save time and money. This is why I love the classic Norwegian dessert riskrem…Riskrem literally translates to ‘rice cream’, and is a great way to make dessert from leftover risgrøt, a traditional dish in Norwegian homes.

read more
A Soup for Potato Lovers

A Soup for Potato Lovers

I love making creamy soups from butternut, potatoes, broccoli, and cauliflower, particularly during colder winter months. It’s simple, quick, nourishing and filling. In this recipe, I cooked potatoes in vegetable broth with a little sautéed onion and garlic and puréed them into a beautifully rich and silky soup. My secret trick is to add in some pre-baked potatoes, which I find adds an extra depth of flavor.

read more
Sweet Orange and Vanilla Custard Buns for Easter

Sweet Orange and Vanilla Custard Buns for Easter

In recreating the wonderful memories of Easter, I couldn’t think of anything more festive and delicious than these sweet, fluffy buns filled with decadent vanilla custard and a glaze made with fresh orange juice. The key to the deliciousness of these buns is to press your own orange juice for both the dough and the glaze from fresh oranges. The flavor is just so much better (and sweeter!), plus you can also save the orange zest and add into your tea or even add some into the dough of the buns.

read more
VILTGRYTE — A Vegan Hunter’s Stew

VILTGRYTE — A Vegan Hunter’s Stew

One of the most popular stews in the fall and winter months in Norway is jegergryte, which can also go by the name of viltgryte or hjortegryte. Respectively, they translate to ‘hunter’s stew’, ‘venison stew’ or ‘deer stew’. Not particularly vegan…but I veganized it!

read more