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Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

What do we eat in Norway for Easter? I think most Norwegians would agree it wouldn’t be Easter without an orange in your backpack or some type of pastry that has oranges in it…This year I wanted to come up with a different recipe for Easter that still evokes the classic flavors and traditions of the holiday. I landed on these delectable cardamom swirl buns filled and glazed with a combination of chocolate and oranges. Who doesn’t love chocolate, right?

read more
Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Nothing makes me happier than a traditional, Norwegian dinner. That usually involved boiled potatoes and gravy, with some type of vegetables. There is something so comforting, simplistic, and hearty about it that truly evokes the flavor of ‘home’ for me. I realized I have posted recipes for meatballs on my blog before, or as we call them in Norway, kjøttkaker, but I’ve never shared a recipe for karbonader, which is slightly different.

read more
Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

I had all sorts of plans to publish this post over a month ago but it seemed like a beast of an article to write so I kept postponing it. But as the saying goes, all good things are worth waiting for, so I hope you will agree that there will be a lot of valuable info (and recipes!) in this post.

read more
Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler loosely translates to ‘candied almonds’ in Norwegian, and a yearly Christmas tradition to make in Norway. You will find these in Sweden and Denmark too and you can see these sweet and crunchy ‘brente mandler’ in the Christmas markets in Germany, where it’s common to add a touch of cinnamon to them. I love this addition so I’ve chosen to include it in my recipe I’m sharing with you here as well.

read more
Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser is a more modern version of a Norwegian holiday cookie that I didn’t grow up with, but in reality, they are like a version of “kransekakestenger”. Made with ground-up nuts (almonds and hazelnuts in this instance), mixed with powdered sugar and a bit of aquafaba (my vegan substitute for egg whites), they are baked, cooled and then dipped in chocolate.

read more
Tekake Norway’s Coffee Cake

Tekake Norway’s Coffee Cake

Norwegian ‘tekake’…such a simple and satisfying cake, really no Norwegian food blog should be without a recipe for it…Tekake literally translates to “tea cake” but can be considered Norway’s coffee cake. I remember buying this cake at bakeries as a special treat as for some reason it wasn’t something my mom made at home. I remember the cake being doughy (it is made with yeast not baking powder), but had this deliciously crunchy, sweet, and cinnamon-scented topping that made me swoon.

read more
Bacalao: Where Norway Meets Portugal

Bacalao: Where Norway Meets Portugal

Bacalao is a Spanish term for dried, salted cod but also refers to a flavorful, slightly spicy stew with tomatoes, roast peppers, potatoes, and olives…Before I continue, I want to make clear that I do not eat fish anymore…So with this blog post, I’m giving you the ultimate bacalao: with all the familiar flavors, added nutrient-rich ingredients (chickpeas are rich in fiber, fish have none) that are less costly for both your wallet and the environment—and I really promise you won’t miss the fish.

read more
Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

I think one of my fondest childhood memories was to walk into our garden and behind the stabbur (storage outhouse) with a cup of sugar where a wild bunch of rhubarbs grew. I would dip a rhubarb stalk into the sugar, and marvel at the tartness of the rhubarb being mellowed out by the granular sugar. While not sounding like a gourmet experience, to my child’s heart it was. It was a sure sign that summer was here and that there were a lot of other things to look forward to – among others bowls of fresh strawberries, which we also grew in our garden.

read more
Summer in Norway Means New Potatoes

Summer in Norway Means New Potatoes

Potatoes. What could be more Norwegian than that? … Today, Norwegians are more adventurous when it comes to preparing potato dishes. We eat them mashed, fried, and baked, and shred them to form special potato dumplings called “potetball” or “kumler.” During midsummer, however, new potatoes are in season in Norway and the most popular dish to make is undoubtedly the potato salad.

read more
Sankthansaften – Norway’s Summer Solstice

Sankthansaften – Norway’s Summer Solstice

While the international world hears of “Midsummer” celebrations in Sweden, Norwegians have a similar celebration around the same time referred to as “Sankthansaften”, also sometimes called “Jonsok”. This was thought to be the birthday of Johannes the Baptist. “Jon” comes from “Johannes” and the ending “ok” is a derivative of “Jonsvaka”, meaning the church would lie awake the night before, awaiting Jon’s birth. The midsummer day has, however…

read more
Havrebrød – Norwegian Oat Bread

Havrebrød – Norwegian Oat Bread

It’s no secret that Norwegians love bread. Not only do we love and eat a lot of it in general, but many are also fantastic bakers. I think it’s generally more common for people in Scandinavia to make their own loaves at home than in any other region of the world. We eat bread for breakfast, lunch, and even as a late evening snack before bed. Whether it’s for our lunch box or the more fancy open-faced sandwiches, bread has always played a huge part in our diet.

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Browse by Category

Food  |  Drinks  | Culture & History  | Travel

Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

What do we eat in Norway for Easter? I think most Norwegians would agree it wouldn’t be Easter without an orange in your backpack or some type of pastry that has oranges in it…This year I wanted to come up with a different recipe for Easter that still evokes the classic flavors and traditions of the holiday. I landed on these delectable cardamom swirl buns filled and glazed with a combination of chocolate and oranges. Who doesn’t love chocolate, right?

read more
Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Nothing makes me happier than a traditional, Norwegian dinner. That usually involved boiled potatoes and gravy, with some type of vegetables. There is something so comforting, simplistic, and hearty about it that truly evokes the flavor of ‘home’ for me. I realized I have posted recipes for meatballs on my blog before, or as we call them in Norway, kjøttkaker, but I’ve never shared a recipe for karbonader, which is slightly different.

read more
Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

I had all sorts of plans to publish this post over a month ago but it seemed like a beast of an article to write so I kept postponing it. But as the saying goes, all good things are worth waiting for, so I hope you will agree that there will be a lot of valuable info (and recipes!) in this post.

read more
Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler loosely translates to ‘candied almonds’ in Norwegian, and a yearly Christmas tradition to make in Norway. You will find these in Sweden and Denmark too and you can see these sweet and crunchy ‘brente mandler’ in the Christmas markets in Germany, where it’s common to add a touch of cinnamon to them. I love this addition so I’ve chosen to include it in my recipe I’m sharing with you here as well.

read more
Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser is a more modern version of a Norwegian holiday cookie that I didn’t grow up with, but in reality, they are like a version of “kransekakestenger”. Made with ground-up nuts (almonds and hazelnuts in this instance), mixed with powdered sugar and a bit of aquafaba (my vegan substitute for egg whites), they are baked, cooled and then dipped in chocolate.

read more
Tekake Norway’s Coffee Cake

Tekake Norway’s Coffee Cake

Norwegian ‘tekake’…such a simple and satisfying cake, really no Norwegian food blog should be without a recipe for it…Tekake literally translates to “tea cake” but can be considered Norway’s coffee cake. I remember buying this cake at bakeries as a special treat as for some reason it wasn’t something my mom made at home. I remember the cake being doughy (it is made with yeast not baking powder), but had this deliciously crunchy, sweet, and cinnamon-scented topping that made me swoon.

read more
Bacalao: Where Norway Meets Portugal

Bacalao: Where Norway Meets Portugal

Bacalao is a Spanish term for dried, salted cod but also refers to a flavorful, slightly spicy stew with tomatoes, roast peppers, potatoes, and olives…Before I continue, I want to make clear that I do not eat fish anymore…So with this blog post, I’m giving you the ultimate bacalao: with all the familiar flavors, added nutrient-rich ingredients (chickpeas are rich in fiber, fish have none) that are less costly for both your wallet and the environment—and I really promise you won’t miss the fish.

read more
Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

Strawberry-Rhubarb Cake

I think one of my fondest childhood memories was to walk into our garden and behind the stabbur (storage outhouse) with a cup of sugar where a wild bunch of rhubarbs grew. I would dip a rhubarb stalk into the sugar, and marvel at the tartness of the rhubarb being mellowed out by the granular sugar. While not sounding like a gourmet experience, to my child’s heart it was. It was a sure sign that summer was here and that there were a lot of other things to look forward to – among others bowls of fresh strawberries, which we also grew in our garden.

read more
Summer in Norway Means New Potatoes

Summer in Norway Means New Potatoes

Potatoes. What could be more Norwegian than that? … Today, Norwegians are more adventurous when it comes to preparing potato dishes. We eat them mashed, fried, and baked, and shred them to form special potato dumplings called “potetball” or “kumler.” During midsummer, however, new potatoes are in season in Norway and the most popular dish to make is undoubtedly the potato salad.

read more
Sankthansaften – Norway’s Summer Solstice

Sankthansaften – Norway’s Summer Solstice

While the international world hears of “Midsummer” celebrations in Sweden, Norwegians have a similar celebration around the same time referred to as “Sankthansaften”, also sometimes called “Jonsok”. This was thought to be the birthday of Johannes the Baptist. “Jon” comes from “Johannes” and the ending “ok” is a derivative of “Jonsvaka”, meaning the church would lie awake the night before, awaiting Jon’s birth. The midsummer day has, however…

read more