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Smultringer

Smultringer

Traditionally associated with Christmas time, these popular Norwegian donuts called smultringer are made from a dough that is often spiced with cardamom, cinnamon, and sometimes lemon or orange zest. Smaller than American donuts, the classic version is fried in lard,...

read more
Toscakake – a simple yet decadent cake

Toscakake – a simple yet decadent cake

Toscacake has to be one of the most popular cakes in Norway, although it is said to have first appeared in cookbooks in Sweden in the 1930s, so technically considered Swedish. Regardless of its origin, it is baked frequently all across Scandinavia and once you try it...

read more
Tjukklefse – a regional taste of Norway

Tjukklefse – a regional taste of Norway

“Lefse” is a common denominator for flat, round, and often soft pastries. They exist in a plethora of varieties all across Norway and around the globe. Originally they were cooked over an open flame on a stone slab or an iron plate, today they are often cooked on a...

read more
Lomper – the tortillas of Norway

Lomper – the tortillas of Norway

Being Norwegian, I am not lacking in ideas of what to do with potatoes. As I’ve mentioned before in my previous posts, where would Norway be without potatoes? We seem to eat it with practically every meal, as this is an easy crop to grow in a  cold weather...

read more
Trollkrem (Norwegian Lingonberry Mousse)

Trollkrem (Norwegian Lingonberry Mousse)

Trollkrem, literally translated as "troll cream" is a popular Norwegian dessert and filling. It is really simple to make and consist only of 3-4 ingredients: whipped egg whites, lingonberries or lingonberry jam (in Norway we call these berries tyttebær), sugar and...

read more
Norvegan Cinnamon Buns 2.0

Norvegan Cinnamon Buns 2.0

As I’ve shared in many previous posts, over the past few years ever since going vegan I’ve committed myself to perfecting the cinnamon bun recipe, or kanelboller as we call them in Norwegian. After all, I’m Scandinavian and there was no way I was forsaking cinnamon...

read more
Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

What do we eat in Norway for Easter? I think most Norwegians would agree it wouldn’t be Easter without an orange in your backpack or some type of pastry that has oranges in it…This year I wanted to come up with a different recipe for Easter that still evokes the classic flavors and traditions of the holiday. I landed on these delectable cardamom swirl buns filled and glazed with a combination of chocolate and oranges. Who doesn’t love chocolate, right?

read more
Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Nothing makes me happier than a traditional, Norwegian dinner. That usually involved boiled potatoes and gravy, with some type of vegetables. There is something so comforting, simplistic, and hearty about it that truly evokes the flavor of ‘home’ for me. I realized I have posted recipes for meatballs on my blog before, or as we call them in Norway, kjøttkaker, but I’ve never shared a recipe for karbonader, which is slightly different.

read more
Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

I had all sorts of plans to publish this post over a month ago but it seemed like a beast of an article to write so I kept postponing it. But as the saying goes, all good things are worth waiting for, so I hope you will agree that there will be a lot of valuable info (and recipes!) in this post.

read more
Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler loosely translates to ‘candied almonds’ in Norwegian, and a yearly Christmas tradition to make in Norway. You will find these in Sweden and Denmark too and you can see these sweet and crunchy ‘brente mandler’ in the Christmas markets in Germany, where it’s common to add a touch of cinnamon to them. I love this addition so I’ve chosen to include it in my recipe I’m sharing with you here as well.

read more
Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Nøtteroser is a more modern version of a Norwegian holiday cookie that I didn’t grow up with, but in reality, they are like a version of “kransekakestenger”. Made with ground-up nuts (almonds and hazelnuts in this instance), mixed with powdered sugar and a bit of aquafaba (my vegan substitute for egg whites), they are baked, cooled and then dipped in chocolate.

read more

Browse by Category

Food  |  Drinks  | Culture & History  | Travel

Smultringer

Smultringer

Traditionally associated with Christmas time, these popular Norwegian donuts called smultringer are made from a dough that is often spiced with cardamom, cinnamon, and sometimes lemon or orange zest. Smaller than American donuts, the classic version is fried in lard,...

read more
Toscakake – a simple yet decadent cake

Toscakake – a simple yet decadent cake

Toscacake has to be one of the most popular cakes in Norway, although it is said to have first appeared in cookbooks in Sweden in the 1930s, so technically considered Swedish. Regardless of its origin, it is baked frequently all across Scandinavia and once you try it...

read more
Tjukklefse – a regional taste of Norway

Tjukklefse – a regional taste of Norway

“Lefse” is a common denominator for flat, round, and often soft pastries. They exist in a plethora of varieties all across Norway and around the globe. Originally they were cooked over an open flame on a stone slab or an iron plate, today they are often cooked on a...

read more
Lomper – the tortillas of Norway

Lomper – the tortillas of Norway

Being Norwegian, I am not lacking in ideas of what to do with potatoes. As I’ve mentioned before in my previous posts, where would Norway be without potatoes? We seem to eat it with practically every meal, as this is an easy crop to grow in a  cold weather...

read more
Trollkrem (Norwegian Lingonberry Mousse)

Trollkrem (Norwegian Lingonberry Mousse)

Trollkrem, literally translated as "troll cream" is a popular Norwegian dessert and filling. It is really simple to make and consist only of 3-4 ingredients: whipped egg whites, lingonberries or lingonberry jam (in Norway we call these berries tyttebær), sugar and...

read more
Norvegan Cinnamon Buns 2.0

Norvegan Cinnamon Buns 2.0

As I’ve shared in many previous posts, over the past few years ever since going vegan I’ve committed myself to perfecting the cinnamon bun recipe, or kanelboller as we call them in Norwegian. After all, I’m Scandinavian and there was no way I was forsaking cinnamon...

read more
Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

Nutella Swirl Buns with Orange Glaze

What do we eat in Norway for Easter? I think most Norwegians would agree it wouldn’t be Easter without an orange in your backpack or some type of pastry that has oranges in it…This year I wanted to come up with a different recipe for Easter that still evokes the classic flavors and traditions of the holiday. I landed on these delectable cardamom swirl buns filled and glazed with a combination of chocolate and oranges. Who doesn’t love chocolate, right?

read more
Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Karbonader with Caramelized Onions, Mashed Peas and Stewed Vegetables

Nothing makes me happier than a traditional, Norwegian dinner. That usually involved boiled potatoes and gravy, with some type of vegetables. There is something so comforting, simplistic, and hearty about it that truly evokes the flavor of ‘home’ for me. I realized I have posted recipes for meatballs on my blog before, or as we call them in Norway, kjøttkaker, but I’ve never shared a recipe for karbonader, which is slightly different.

read more
Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

Scandinavian Open-Face Sandwiches

I had all sorts of plans to publish this post over a month ago but it seemed like a beast of an article to write so I kept postponing it. But as the saying goes, all good things are worth waiting for, so I hope you will agree that there will be a lot of valuable info (and recipes!) in this post.

read more
Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler

Brente Mandler loosely translates to ‘candied almonds’ in Norwegian, and a yearly Christmas tradition to make in Norway. You will find these in Sweden and Denmark too and you can see these sweet and crunchy ‘brente mandler’ in the Christmas markets in Germany, where it’s common to add a touch of cinnamon to them. I love this addition so I’ve chosen to include it in my recipe I’m sharing with you here as well.

read more

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