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Food Culture and Traditions in the Fjords of Norway

Food Culture and Traditions in the Fjords of Norway

This post is sure to be the first of many parts where I dive into Norwegian food culture, and what makes it different, special and unique. Having lived in multiple countries, I am fascinated with both differences and similarities among countries, which is what inspired me to write a few words on this topic.

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Easy No-Knead Bread Recipe

Easy No-Knead Bread Recipe

I can’t imagine a world without bread. Perhaps it’s the Scandinavian in me, but I feel tremendous happiness in enjoying a big hunk of bread, slathered with butter or some other topping, paired with a nice glass of wine. Give me that, and that’s all I knead (pun intended).

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Celebrating Midsummer with Norwegian Rømmegrøt

Celebrating Midsummer with Norwegian Rømmegrøt

Jonsok, or Sankthansaften, is a midsummer marker traditionally celebrated on June 24th and historically a Catholic holiday. Jonsok / Sankthans is named after the baptist Johannes, whose Danish saint name is St. Hans. Religious history describes how Johannes baptized Jesus in the Jordan river, and was the first one who recognized him as the Messiah. The word Jonsok is an Old Norse word which translates to “waking night for Jon” (short for Johannes).

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Norwegian Fastelavnsboller with a Swedish Twist

Norwegian Fastelavnsboller with a Swedish Twist

Fastelavn is celebrated the Sunday before Ash Wednesday and evolved from the Roman Catholic tradition of celebrating the days before Lent. Often referred to as the Nordic Halloween, children will dress up in costumes and gather treats for the fastelavnfeast. Although we don’t see as much of this tradition in Norway, it’s still practiced in Denmark, who I think are the masters of fastelavn and are known for parades and festivities across the country.

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Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Cinnamon-Sugar Kringle

Who has heard of kringle? The kringle is a popular Scandinavian pastry here in the U.S. among those familiar with Nordic cuisine. Often times referred to as the Nordic pretzel because of its similarity in shape, it is said to have arrived in Scandinavian in the 13th century with the Roman Catholic monks. Denmark might be better known for its kringler, and although I’m Norwegian must admit the Danes perhaps have a slight upper hand on coming up with creative varieties of this delicious knot-shaped pastry. The Danish are thought to be the ones who brought kringle to the United States too, so kudos to them for that!

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Gløgg: Scandinavia’s Mulled Red Wine

Gløgg: Scandinavia’s Mulled Red Wine

No Christmas is complete without a hot, spicy cup of gløgg (mulled wine) which warms up your body all the way through to the root of your hair! Sitting down with a glass of gløgg is wonderfully relaxing and tasty in between the stressful pre-holiday chores like cleaning, shopping, and cooking.

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Norwegian Pepperkaker to kick off Christmas

Norwegian Pepperkaker to kick off Christmas

The first Christmas cookies I typically eat, are pepperkaker. These crispy, flavorful gingerbread cookies are seen everywhere across Norway from early December on to the end of the year, and a clear favorite among many kids and grown-ups alike.  Nothing creates the feeling of Christmas quite like the smell of these aromatic cookies baking in the oven. Gingerbread houses are also common to make, particularly in households with small children. In fact, the world’s largest gingerbread city is located in Bergen, Norway and opens every year during this time of year.

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