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Nøtteroser – A Norwegian Christmas Cookie You’ll Want to Make

Dec 5, 2020

2020 has been a bit of a different year for us to put it mildly, and therefore I believe we deserve to treat ourselves with extra cookies!

The season is here for embracing that extra cheer and bring some happiness to our lives via the kitchen, and I for one, am really welcoming it with open arms! In that spirit, I also created a brand new holiday cookie recipe e-book which you can get here.

In the spirit of some extra indulgence, this year I set out to try out and test some brand new recipes for the blog of untraditional cookies that aren’t part of the classic “seven” we so famously make in Norway, but also other cookies that Norwegians bake and regularly make during the holidays today.

Nøtteroser is a more modern version of a Norwegian holiday cookie that I didn’t grow up with, but in reality, they are like a version of “kransekakestenger”. Made with ground-up nuts (almonds and hazelnuts in this instance), mixed with powdered sugar and a bit of aquafaba (my vegan substitute for egg whites), they are baked, cooled and then dipped in chocolate.

Crispy on the outside, chewy and sweet yet light on the inside with little crunch from the addition of a whole hazelnut in the middle—I mean, what’s not to love? They also make for a super decorative addition to your table, as they are really pretty too!

I find that grinding the nuts by hand in a nut grinder instead of using a food processor makes for a much better and ‘chewier’ texture in the cookies as the oils are more gently released using the hand method.

I would also carefully monitor the cookies in the oven as every oven is different. I’d rather pull the cookies out too soon (before you think they are ready) than having them go too long—they can flatten in seconds! Start with 4 minutes and check them at every minute after that but I’d say 5 minutes is the perfect/”golden” time for me…

I hope you will try these out—let me know if you do and tag me #arcticgrub on social media! 🙂
 

Nøtteroser

Makes about 20 cookies

100 grams raw hazelnuts, ground
64 grams raw almonds, ground
150 grams fine organic granulated sugar or powdered sugar
½ cup (1 dl) whipped aquafaba*

For decoration:
20 whole hazelnuts
2 cups (220 grams) dark chocolate chips, melted

*For the whipped aquafaba:
½ cup (1 dl) aquafaba (canned chickpea liquid)
¼ tsp cream of tartar
4 heaping tablespoons powdered sugar

To prepare the aquafaba:

Pour the aquafaba and cream of tartar in a bowl of a stand mixer and whisk on high speed for about 3-4 minutes. Gradually add in the powdered sugar and whisk for another 2-3 minutes until stiff peaks form.

To make the cookies:

Preheat the oven to 400° Fahrenheit (200° Celsius). Line a couple of baking sheets with silpats or parchment paper.

Using a nut grinder, grind the hazelnuts and almonds and combine in a bowl with the granulated or powdered sugar. Fold in the whipped aquafaba carefully, not all at once, until you have a smooth, firm dough but not super wet. The dough needs to be loose enough to be able to squeeze out of a pastry bag but not liquidy.

Place the batter in a pastry bag fitted with a decorative tip and pipe dollops (about 1 heaping tablespoon) of batter onto the prepared cookie sheets (let them be mounds, don’t flatten them out).

Carefully place a hazelnut in the middle and bake in the middle rack of the oven for about 5 minutes until lightly golden on the sides. Remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack.

While the cookies cool off, melt the chocolate in a double boiler.

Dip the bottom of the cookies in the chocolate (or drizzle up top). If dipping the bottom, place the cookies upside down on a sheet tray lined with a rack and let the coating dry before placing them in a cookie box or serving.

Keeps for 5-7 days in a cool room in an airtight box. You can also freeze them and they will keep for about 3 months (although I doubt they’ll last that long!).

Nøtteroser

Nøtteroser is a more modern version of a Norwegian holiday cookie that I didn’t grow up with, but in reality, they are like a version of “kransekakestenger”. Made with ground-up nuts (almonds and hazelnuts in this instance), mixed with powdered sugar and a bit of aquafaba (my vegan substitute for egg whites), they are baked, cooled and then dipped in chocolate.
Crispy on the outside, chewy and sweet yet light on the inside with little crunch from the addition of a whole hazelnut in the middle—I mean, what’s not to love?
Print Pin Rate
Servings: 20 cookies

Ingredients

  • 100 grams raw hazelnuts ground
  • 64 grams raw almonds ground
  • 150 grams fine organic granulated sugar or powdered sugar
  • ½ cup 1 dl whipped aquafaba*

For decoration:

  • 20 whole hazelnuts
  • 2 cups 220 grams dark chocolate chips, melted

*For the whipped aquafaba:

  • ½ cup 1 dl aquafaba (canned chickpea liquid)
  • ¼ tsp cream of tartar
  • 4 heaping tablespoons powdered sugar

Instructions

To prepare the aquafaba:

  • Pour the aquafaba and cream of tartar in a bowl of a standmixer and whisk on high speed for about 3-4 minutes. Gradually add in the powdered sugar and whisk for another 2-3 minutes until stiff peaks form.

To make the cookies:

  • Preheat the oven to 400° Fahrenheit (200° Celsius). Line a couple of baking sheets with silpats or parchment paper.
  • Using a nut grinder, grind the hazelnuts and almonds and combine in a bowl with the granulated or powdered sugar. Fold in the whipped aquafaba carefully, not all at once, until you have a smooth, firm dough but not super wet. The dough needs to be loose enough to be able to squeeze out of a pastry bag but not liquidy.
  • Place the batter in a pastry bag fitted with a decorative tip and pipe dollops (about 1 heaping tablespoon) of batter onto the prepared cookie sheets (let them be mounds, don’t flatten them out), carefully place a hazelnut in the middle and bake in the middle rack of the oven for about 5 minutes until lightly golden on the sides. Remove from the oven and place on a cooling rack.
  • While the cookies cool off, melt the chocolate in a double boiler.
  • Dip the bottom of the cookies in the chocolate (or drizzle up top). If dipping the bottom, place the cookies upside down on a sheet tray lined with a rack and let the coating dry before placing them in a cookie box or serving.
  • Keeps for 5-7 days in a cool room in an airtight box. You can also freeze them and they will keep for about 3 months (although I doubt they’ll last that long!).

Notes

Grinding the nuts by hand in a nut grinder instead of using a food processor makes for a much better and ‘chewier’ texture in the cookies as the oils are more gently released using the hand method. 
Carefully monitor the cookies in the oven as every oven is different. I’d rather pull the cookies out too soon (before you think they are ready) than having them go too long—they can flatten in seconds! Start with 4 minutes and check them at every minute after that.

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